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Do:
Feed nutritious diets. 
There are many brands and formulations of cat foods fighting for your market dollars, however not all of them are good for your pet.  Buy a quality food!  The better quality ingredients will help insure superior health and lower veterinary expenses.  
Feed life-stage diets. 
Life-stage diets are prepared for the varying needs of animals of different ages.  Kittens have higher requirements than older felines, so their foods must be fortified with protein and vitamin and mineral levels that are not necessary for adults.  Adults and seniors have differing needs also, and their individual requirements are met by producing diets that are tailored for the various age levels. 
It is best to feed foods from manufacturers that follow these guidelines since your pet will have a greater chance of living a longer, healthier life because of better nutrition.  You may also enjoy reduced veterinary costs as an added benefit.  Medi-Cal, a Canadian company established by veterinarians in 1990, has a full line of these superior diets. 
Provide plenty of fresh, clean water. 
House cats must have their water changed daily, and you must check it at frequent intervals to make certain there is plenty available. 
Outside cats are totally dependent on you for both food and water during both summer and winter, and often the liquids are more important.  Give them access to large amounts of water in large bowls because they will need it.  Hot temperatures rapidly result in overheating of any animal with the possibility of heat stroke and death.  In winter, water sources must be cleared of ice during freezing weather so your pet can drink.
Do Not:
Never overfeed your cat. 
Overfeeding results in overweight or obese pets, and this shortens their lives. 
Never feed your pet human foods. 
Once a pet is allowed to start, it often waits to receive those foods, and will sometimes refuse the nutritious pet foods it really needs.  This practice frequently leads to obesity and digestive upsets. 
Carefully monitor your cat's access to food. 
Cats with free access to foods often suffer from weight gain and obesity.  Feeding at intervals can be an alternative practice.  Kittens may be given three or four feedings daily for periods of 20 to 30 minutes at a time depending on their size and appetite, and adults may be fed two times daily in accordance with their size and weight.  Larger breeds need more food, and heavier cats need less.  Once the pets has had access to it's food for the necessary 20 to 30 minutes, remove the food and wait until the next feeding period before offering anything again. 
These rules may be altered if need be since cats are notoriously finicky about their foods.  Cats must have food source because, if they do not eat, they may sicken quickly.